May 23, 2024
Big Girls Don't Cry

Big Girls Don’t Cry Story:

This coming-of-age drama, which takes place in a fictionalized all-girls boarding school, centers on a group of youngsters as they navigate life through adventure, misadventure, and self-discovery.

Review:

A fictitious all-girls boarding school is the setting for a tapestry of adolescent life filled with themes of misadventure, adventure, and self-discovery. Viewers are invited into a world where love blossoms among the chaos of adolescence, friendships are made in the fire of rebellion, and laws are designed to be broken in Big Girls Don’t Cry (BGDC)”.

Seven unique personalities are introduced to us in the episode, all of them are attempting to make a lasting impression on the university while navigating the turbulent seas of their senior year. Scholarship student Kavya Yadav (Vidushi) comes into the fight determined to forge her route. While Leah Joseph, also known as Ludo (Avantika Vandanapu), wants to be the best in sports, Noor Hassan (Afrah Sayed) wants to be the captain of her school. While Dia (Akshita Sood) finds comfort in poetry and disobedience, Anandita aka Pluggy (Dalai) dreams of big plans, while Roohi (Aneet Padda) and Jayshree Chhetry or JC (Tenzin Lhakyila) aim to succeed in the beauty industry.

“BGDC,” a show by Nitya Mehra, provides a glimpse into the lives of these young ladies as they navigate the difficulties of puberty. The story, which is primarily driven by women, tackles issues of independence, friendship, love, and pursuing one’s aspirations while creating a realistic picture of the struggles and victories of adolescence.

The show does a good job of bringing back memories of high school, but it struggles to keep the plot consistent. Occasionally, the intricate storyline loses focus and leaves viewers floating aimlessly amid a sea of friendship and family dynamics. The lead cast, which includes Vidushi as the outsider, Avantika Vandanapu as the girl hiding her identity, Afrah Sayed as the person battling societal expectations, Dalai as the expert in virgin sexting, Akshita Sood as the rebellious girl, and best friends JC and Aneet Padda dealing with their familial issues, all give strong performances that shine through despite the film’s shortcomings.

Although Pooja Bhatt’s character arc could have been more skillfully developed, she gives a strong performance as the school principal. Although Mukul Chadda, Raima Sen, and Zoya Hussain offer capable assistance, their parts seem underutilized in advancing the story.

In conclusion, “BGDC” isn’t quite a riveting series, but it does provide a nostalgic stroll down memory lane. It’s charming performances and relevant themes might make it worthwhile to see once, but ultimately, it doesn’t make an impact.

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